Archive for activism

Ejeris Dixon & Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, “BEYOND SURVIVAL” w/ Guests

Posted in skylight books, book stores, books, Crime, nonfiction, anthology, essays, activism, politics by skylightbooks on March 4th, 2020

Afraid to call 911, but not sure what to do instead? Read this book! Beyond Survival collects tools, strategies and personal stories of the struggle to create safety, justice and accountability beyond the criminal justice system. 

This long-awaited and deeply necessary book documents some of the work of the transformative justice movement- collecting everything from personal stories of successful interventions in abuse and violence to guides to being accountable if you’ve been abusive, from strategies to support folks having emotional crises without calling 911 to toolkits for creating safer party spaces and community safety zones from ICE.  Along the way, there’s plenty of personal essays and reflections from long time organizers on the state of the movement, and visions for the future we’re building that will bring us all home.  

Editors Ejeris Dixon and Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha are in conversation with activist-contributors Amita Swadhin and Raquel Lavina.

 




Dina Gilio-Whitaker, “AS LONG AS THE GRASS GROWS”

Posted in skylight books, book stores, books, native authors, nonfiction, activism, history, sociology by skylightbooks on July 4th, 2019

In As Long As Grass Grows, author and activist Dina Gilio-Whitaker argues that colonization was not just an invasion of and domination over Indigenous populations by European settlers, but that a central harm of colonization was the environmental injustices it imposed. Gilio-Whitaker traces this systemic dispossession of sacred land from Indigenous peoples from early colonization through today, arguing that it represents the greatest form of environmental injustice for Indigenous populations in the United States. 

Gilio-Whitaker traces how the new Red Power movement of the '70s and '80s, and other women-led movements for Indigenous environmental justice spurred cooperation between environmentalists, tribes, and the government. In 1991, the People of Color Environmental Justice Theory Leadership Summit produced the Principles of Environmental Justice with seventeen points that represented a greater level of inclusion for Indigenous concerns than the preceding studies had, framing environmental justice in terms of colonial histories and oppressive political domination.




Nicole Seymour, “BAD ENVIRONMENTALISM”

Posted in skylight books, book stores, books, nonfiction, activism, politics, nature by skylightbooks on November 20th, 2018

Activists today strive to educate the public about climate change, but sociologists have found that the more we know about alarming issues, the less likely we are to act. Meanwhile, environmentalists have acquired a reputation as gloom-and-doom killjoys. Bad Environmentalism identifies contemporary texts that respond to these absurdities and ironies through absurdity and irony—as well as camp, frivolity, irreverence, perversity, and playfulness.

Nicole Seymour develops the concept of “bad environmentalism”: cultural thought that employs dissident affects and sensibilities to reflect critically on our current moment and on mainstream environmental activism. From the television show Wildboyz to the short film series Green Porno, Seymour shows that this tradition of thought is widespread—spanning animation, documentary, fiction film, performance art, poetry, prose fiction, social media, and stand-up comedy since at least 1975. Seymour argues that these texts reject self-righteousness and sentimentality, undercutting public negativity toward activism and questioning basic environmentalist assumptions: that love and reverence are required for ethical relationships with the nonhuman and that knowledge is key to addressing problems like climate change.




Nadya Tolokonnikova, “READ & RIOT” w/ Shepard Fairey

Posted in literature, skylight books, book stores, books, Memoir, Feminism, Punk Music, nonfiction, music, activism, politics, LGBTQ by skylightbooks on October 30th, 2018

Feminist artist, political activist, and Pussy Riot founder Nadya Tolokonnikova has written a timely guide to radical protest and provides the words, actions, and inspiration to ignite the power of individuals to passionately resist and proactively plan our way to the change we want to see. In Read & Riot: A Pussy Riot Guide to Activism, the revered international activist draws upon her own hard-won wisdom to share her core principles for opposing leaders and governments that threaten to suppress individual rights and freedoms. Cutting through the pessimism, fear, uncertainty, and hopelessness, Read & Riot is an empowering tool for civil disobedience that encourages us to question the status quo, reject the litany of injustices and refuse to let apathy take hold, and above all, to make political action exciting, to be approached with a sense of humor, and an ultimately make it an integral part of our daily lives.  Fusing punk and positivity to create a culture of protest that inspires and connects us, Read & Riot includes actions, suggestions, and resources for creating an empowered movement of resistance.

Tolokonnikova is in conversation with fellow artist-activist Shepard Fairey.




LAMBDA Litfest: “Trumpocalypse”

Posted in skylight books, book stores, books, Washington DC, nonfiction, journalism, activism, politics by skylightbooks on October 14th, 2018

Four writers and a renowned book editor discuss the role of books and those who write them in such desperate times as these. Is it worth writing books? If so, what kinds of books? If not, what shall we writers do with ourselves for the duration?

Panelists include: Melissa Chadburn, Dan Smentanka, Cindy Chupack, Natashia Deon, moderated by Meredith Maran.




Onnesha Rouychouduri, “THE MARGINALIZED MAJORITY” w/ Jenny Yang

Posted in skylight books, book stores, books, nonfiction, activism by skylightbooks on September 1st, 2018

The Marginalized Majority is an empowering take on living in the United States under the Trump administration, recounting each epic moment in the last year and reworking it to show the power of minority and grassroots organizations—both in our nation’s history and today—despite the clamoring of dissenting pundits. For Onnesha Roychoudhuri it is evident: to be a true ally, to see true change, we must fight for the rights of our most disenfranchised and never have we been more awake to their needs than now.

Rouychoudhuri is joined in conversation by Jenny Yang, former labor organizer turned standup comedian, writer and actor.




James Pogue, “CHOSEN COUNTRY” w/ David Garrett Byars

Posted in skylight books, book stores, books, nonfiction, journalism, activism by skylightbooks on August 26th, 2018

In a remote corner of Oregon, James Pogue found himself at the heart of a rebellion. Granted unmatched access by Ammon Bundy to the armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Pogue met ranchers and militiamen ready to die fighting the federal government.

He witnessed the fallout of communities riven by politics and the danger (and allure) of uncompromising religious belief. The occupation ended in the shooting death of one rancher, the imprisonment of dozens more, and a firestorm over the role of government that engulfed national headlines.

In a raw and restless narrative that roams the same wild terrain as his literary forebears Edward Abbey and Hunter S. Thompson, Pogue's Chosen Country examines the underpinnings of this rural uprising and struggles to reconcile diverging ideas of freedom, tracing a cultural fault line that spans the nation.

Pogue is joined by David Garrett Byars, who made his directorial debut at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival with No Man's Land, a documentary about the 2016 occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.




David Correia and Tyler Wall, “POLICE: A FIELD GUIDE”

Posted in skylight books, book stores, books, True Crime, Crime, journalism, activism by skylightbooks on July 14th, 2018

Join author/activists David Correia and Tyler Wall for an in-depth discussion on the language that we use to talk about policing and police reform in the hopes that understanding the historical context of these terms will help us move beyond the limits of police reform and toward a society free from police violence and free from police entirely.

Police: A Field Guide is an illustrated handbook to the methods, mythologies, and history that animate today’s police. It is a survival manual for encounters with cops and police logic, whether it arrives in the shape of officer friendly, Tasers, curfews, non-compliance, or reformist discourses about so-called bad apples. In a series of short chapters, each focusing on a single term, such as the beat, order, badge, throw-down weapon, and much more, authors David Correia and Tyler Wall present a guide that reinvents and demystifies the language of policing in order to better prepare activists—and anyone with an open mind—on one of the key issues of our time: police brutality. In doing so, they begin to chart a future free of this violence—and of police.





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